The Best Teacher Ever

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    My favorite teacher was my freshman math teacher. He was one of the the goofiest people I ever knew, but incredibly nice and you could really tell he cared about the subject and all of his students. His class was always the best - I felt most confortable in the environment he set up and it was fun every day. I had hated math up until that point, but he taught me to love it! He was always so clear in his explanations and I could always understand what he was trying to get at. He always came into the classroom bring a positive attitude that set us all going.


    The best teacher I had was a lady named Mrs. Browning. She was my third grade teacher. It was she who inspired me to be a teacher in the first place. She also lead me to be a Laura Ingalls Wilder fan and a better person.


    my favorite teacher is mrs. Baldinelli. She is my math teacher right now. i'm in seventh grade.She is my favorite teacher because she tells alot of funny stories. she also make funny faces like raising her eyebrows. one day she put up a trick question on the board. (the answer to it was yes) a boy in our class almost said no but blurted out that her face looked funny! she said "WHAT" in her angry but funny voice. well i mean your face it looked funny. "What" she said again. i mean i could tell it was supposed to be tricky the boy replied. it was so funny! another great thing about Mrs. Baldinelli is that when we grade our homework she acts like she's going to say one number(we all freak out) and says another. there are so many other great things about her. Mrs. Baldinelli is the best teacher ever, i will never foget her.


    Believe it or not my favorite teacher was named Mr. Yelle. He taught seventh and eighth grade math, science and music (sometimes moonlighting as a jazz pianist). He spoke to us "at eye level", and had infinite patience and tolerance for anything except unkindness. We did incredible projects for the scinece fairs. To this day (and I'm talking 40 years ago) I remember our lessons on meteorology (we built a weather station!) and on human anatomy (which 12-year-old boys and girls were able to take seriously with not an offensive word, leer or sneer). By the way, he didn't yell.


    Prof. Roston is the best teacher ever. Although retired he still teaches at Bar Ilan and California. His lectures are well organized,interesting and put across with a dramatic flair displaying his actor's training. He has a vast knowledge of literature, art, philosophy, Judaism, history - all of which he can quote from freely. He turned me on to English literature. Moreover,he was approachable and always had time for students. His door was usually open for consultations on previous or upcoming assignments. His comments on papers were constructive and encouraging.


    The best teacher I ever had was my eighth grade science teacher, Mr. Jack Herr. He was the funniest person i had ever known in my life, every class was fun and i actually learned stuff about science. He was the one person who really understood me and he changed my life dramatically and i forever thank him for that. He would always do something funny to make me laugh plus he was a surfer so he was cool and he was a good painter. But soon the year ended and this was his last year at my school he was moving to Switzerland and the last thing I ever got from him was a CD that he made for me. I miss him so much and he is the best person I know and the best teacher ever.


    My best teacher was Elaine Hoter from Talpiot College in Tel-Aviv. Her lessons were extremely interesting, efficient and absolutely fascinating. She always practiced what she preached: her methods of teaching us demonstrated the desirable teaching methods for our use. Her lovely personality also contributed to the success of her teaching and lessons. She made every student feel like one of her own. Having her as a teacher was a blessing! I wish her all the best. Ruthie Ellen


    My English teacher Rena Keynan in Holon. Each lesson was interesting and full of surprises. Many students of her became english teachers thanks to her. She is simply ADORABLE!!!


    The best teacher I have ever had was my 7th grade social studies teacher. She was always in a good mood and kept us laughing. She was really young so she acted like us teenagers which made learning fun. If we needed to talk to an adult about a problem we always knew we could come to her and she could help.She always added a fun "twist" on learning which made the topic easy to understand.


    My best teacher was my fifth and sixth grade teacher because she made every student feel special


    The teacher who: first of all explained material well, in depth but in clear language, not as university indifferent lecturers running in gallope, second, generously marking the students' work- who try hard, and enabling them to achieve what they deserve, third, not wasting preceous time on silly jokes while there is enough time for more important things:e.g.class discussions,little experiments etc.


    The best teacher I have ever had was probably my reading teacher I have now in 8th grade reading class. Her name is Mrs. Wilt! She is the most thoughtful person in whole world! She only does things that help her students! Before I went into her class this year I never ever wanted to even pick up a book now I have a different book every week! Because of her I know what I want to be when I grow up, I either want to be a reading teacher so I can help kids to want to read(like mrs.wilt did for me) or I want to be an author so I can persuade kids to want to read! Mrs. Wilt is always there for me to listen to my problems or when I'm in a bad mood she cheers me up! She's not just a teacher she is also a friend, I can talk to her just like I talk to one of my close friends! I love her like a sister and I am goin to miss her when I go to the high school next year!


    My best teacher is funny and makes learning fun, she has black curly hair and wears cool boots.


    My bestever teacher was my geography teacher in high school. She explained everything extremely clearly, then checked every student's notebook to make sure the student had written down what she said and drawn the maps and diagrams correctly. I can still remember a large part of what she taught decades later! Discipline problems didn't exist in her class because there was never an idle moment, or a boring one.


    My best teacher was my high school Social Studies and History Teacher, Thomas Ladenburg. He was respectful of us as pupils, he knew how to listen, class was never boring because it was discussion based and when we got to class we always knew what to expect. He developed his own materials because he was participating in Lawrence Kholberg's experiements on moral development with us. He shared his own learning experiences with us as well. The most outstanding teacher I've ever had in all my years of education is Miriam Schlessinger, from whom I had the pleasure of learning translation with at Bar-Ilan. She was organized, respectful and interesting. But the best thing was that she knew how to criticize our work and ask questions to make us think. I learned more from her about teaching than I did about translation (and I learned a lot about translation!) Michele Ben


    My best teacher ever was my Geography teacher in 8th grade. Why? Because we did projects! Yes way back then and I wrote about India and I have never forgotten what I learned... Maybe that is why I embrace the projects today. He brought to life the culture by letting me become part of it. He also listened to us and was always ready with a kind word. So in my opinion the best teacher is the teacher who listens to his/her pupils. I mean really listens!!!


    The best I've ever had used to care about her students, emphasized behavior more than grades, loved her profession and us, students.


    The best teacher I ever had was my high school English teacher in the U.S. because he knew exactly how to appreciate and yes, utilize, our natural initiative and enthusiasm. We were one of those classes that if portrayed in a positive light would be called rambunctious, exuberant and smart. Our sole goal, we were teenagers after all, was to have a good time. We could turn any material into a good time, that is if teachers let us, and most did not. But our English teacher was different. A good example was our weekly vocabulary lists. He let us transform what could easily have been a very run-of-the-mill weekly vocabulary assignment in which we were to write a story incorporating as many of the new words as possible. With his blessing, we turned those vocabulary assignments into a weekly exchange of witticisms and laughter as we wrote our stories about each other, making fun of and teasing each other, inventing all kinds of tall tales, especially of the romantic order and including as well many other pieces of trivia we would otherwise have been talking about out in the quad. We read the stories aloud in class and those weekly readings became a highly attended, exciting event during which we did learn some vocabulary and laughed even more. I try to remember this when I teach my own students -- that as a teenager, laden with all the issues and concerns that any normal teenager has, what I most wanted and appreciated was learning in a light, enjoyable way. And for this I always tell myself that if my students are not being engaged, or dare I say, entertained in some way, they probably aren't learning, at least not in any meaningful way. They are teenagers and they are different. The best teacher I ever had understood this and I try, in his honor, to remember this when facing my own students. I am not always successful.


    The teacher who makes you realise that you can achieve whatever you want to, if you're willing to work for it...and also cares that you do!


    She wasn't perfect for sometimes her passion was too intense. But one thing we always knew was that she wanted to instill a love of words and language to all of us, and to make us better,caring people. She, of course, was an English teacher in my 10th grade. During my year with her the girls began to write poetry because of her direction and encouragement and at the end of the year we published a journal of our writing. I would like to give you an example of her teaching method: One day she wrote on the board"ESCHEW OBFUSCATION" Then she spoke about the importance of writing well and intelligently but without losing sight of our readers. For those of you who might not be familiar with those words it means "avoid confusion'


    She knew lots. She shared her knowledge and experience freely. She was warm,loving and open. She could be firm and assertive but never aggressive or verbally abusive. She graded generously, yet had high demands. Her time was available to her students.


    It was the early thirties of the last century in London a long time ago. Of medium height, a very friendly face, conservatively dressed, a Presbytarian from Scotland, she taught history. Among the female staff of spinsters in a girls'school(after WWI, you could not teach if you were married) she was not a school marm, nor was she like the teacher in "The Weakest Link". She taught history because she loved it and she made us love it. The characters she described came to life and the dates of battles became unimportant even though we had to learn them for exams. She encouraged us to read historical novels which I like to this day. I didn't really like school, she made it bearable. When she left to head a school in Australia, I really missed her. I knew no other teachers like her in the school. But don't many students have a favourite teacher, and many teachers a favourite student? I plead guilty to the latter too.


    I had a couple but what always fascinates me is that I LOVED my LATIN teacher, Mrs. White. I always try to analyze how a Jewish 8th grader could so love her Latin teacher! She was beautiful but stern (she, obviously, came from Catholic schools) and made us memorize the millions of forms in Latin and we did it, happily! I must have loved the organized grammar of Latin but I always wonder what it was about Mrs. White...I can't even locate her with a name like that...I don't know her first name although I once saw her again when we were both buying shoes for our children at a shoestore in Rochester, NY, before our Aliya in 1978...hic haec hoc. And veni vidi vici!


    Computer teacher. Still teaching. She knew how to let me alone and trusted me to do my own work at my own pace, something that teachers nowadays seem unable to do. Amazing woman! JRM


    kind, flexible, supportive, sense of humor---to be honest, I think the summer school teachers were the best, not my regular ones


    She always was fair. Gave a tremendous amount of homework, frequent quizzes, and returned the results within 2-3 days. She opened the "outside" world to us ( 4th and 6th graders) and taught us things that were of interest.. not necessarily from the textbook.


    professional & human


    Gail Anderson was my grade 9 English teacher. She was one of those hippy types but she treated us with respect and cared about each one of us. Actually, we guys had a crush on her too. She took the time to really teach us literature and how to write. I will always remember how she would write meaningful comments and suggestions for writing, organizing and presenting better work. We always wanted to please her and in the end pleased ourselves. She made a difference in our lives. She shaped our destiny and gave us confidence. That is why I teach today.


    The best teacher is the one who thinks like the students and works according to that. He must love his subject - English. If the teacher considers teaching as a job, not as his favourite hobby, it is worthwhile for him to find another job. The best teacher must prepare more than his students.


    understanding and funny


    He made us think. I think it was the first time I was really made to think in high school. Instead of just learning about the major revolutions in history, we relived them. Playing the devil's advocate, he forced us to look at the world through the eyes of the people involved. We took their parts and argued their causes, and tried to convince each other what was just. This way, we understood the complexity of history, and its meaning for us, and no longer conceived of it simply as a time line to be memorized.



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